Rwandan genocide: what future for Hutu refugees? – #Focus

Rwandan genocide: what future for Hutu refugees? – #Focus

Rwandan genocide: what future for Hutu refugees? – #Focus


As Rwanda marks 20 years since the 1994 genocide, we report on the Hutus who fled to neighbouring Democratic Republic of Congo after the Tutsis took power. About two million people crossed the border, including militiamen who took part in the slaughter, and they set up the FDLR – the Democratic Forces for the Liberation of Rwanda – the self-proclaimed defenders of Hutu refugees. France 24’s correspondents Léa-Lisa Westerhoff and Mehdi Meddeb have been to meet them.
04/08/2014 FOCUS
An exclusive in-depth report from a FRANCE24 correspondent, followed by comment and analysis with the author and the anchor in the newsroom in Paris.
FRANCE 24 INTERNATIONAL NEWS 24/7
http://www.france24.com

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9 Responses

  1. Only France 24 can dare to ask that question. Instead of asking the future of genocide survivors you are asking the future of those that killed. They don’t even deserve to breathe as far as we are concerned.

  2. These people don’t deserve to breathe: just ask any Tutsi.
    Read the facts below:
    During 1993, the hardliners imported machetes on a scale far larger than what was required for agriculture, as well as other tools which could be used as weapons, such as razor blades, saws and scissors.
    The killings ceased during April in the akazu heartlands of western Ruhengeri and Gisenyi, as almost every Tutsi had been eliminated.
    Large numbers of Hutu in the RPF conquered areas fled, fearing retribution for the genocide;[157] 500,000 Kibungo residents walked over the bridge at Rusumo Falls, into Tanzania, in a few days at the end of April,[158] and were accommodated in United Nations camps effectively controlled by ousted leaders of the Hutu regime,[159] with the former prefect of Kibungo prefecture in overall control.
    In the remaining prefectures, killings continued throughout May and June, although they became increasingly low-key and sporadic;[136] most Tutsi were already dead, and the interim government wished to rein in the growing anarchy and engage the population in fighting the RPF.

  3. They should never be allowed back. Butchering hundreds of thousands of people even chopping babies heads off so they should loose their country.

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