Military Parade – South Africa (1945)

Military Parade – South Africa (1945)

Military Parade – South Africa (1945)


Johannesburg, South Africa.

Title reads ‘To assist those who fight for us”.

Various shots of big military parade through crowded streets of Johannesburg – troops, nurses, tanks. Several air shots of big fair. Several shots of the crowd at fair.

General Smuts is seen inspecting the Guard of Honour at the ceremonial opening of the fair. Mass of the South African Air Force planes flying over in formation. Several air to air shots of the planes in flight.

General Smuts addressing large audience at the opening ceremony – natural sound. He is talking about the terrible war, South African contribution in the battle of El Alamein. People applauding. He talks about global war, then thanks South Africans on their contribution.

Various shots of the fair, rides, crowds having fun. Long shot of the Soviet pavilion with large red star and line of red flags in front. Several shots of the miniature town with various styles houses etc. Model railway with children watching the train travelling. Various shots of the weapons on display. Little boy is seen ‘operating’ antiaircraft gun.

Several shots of the arena with cowboy riding strange motorcycle. Various shots of the procession of old canons with men in period clothes with them. Some of the modern guns drawn by lorries seen. Various shots of line of old and new guns in action in arena, crowd watching the display. Several shots of the women services staging a large PT display – item abruptly stops here.
FILM ID:2147.03

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One Response

  1. Todd, it is a swagger stick or a leather bound cane, carried as a mark of authority, during the twentieth century, by officers, especially inspecting officers

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